NPI's Cascadia Advocate

Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate provides the Northwest Progressive Institute's uplifting perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Friday, June 2nd, 2023

Last Week In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. lawmakers voted (May 30th-June 2nd)

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Mem­bers of Con­gress vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing June 2nd, 2023.

In the United States House of Representatives

Chamber of the United States House of Representatives

The House cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

BUDGET, DEBT LIMIT RANSOM DEMAND LEGISLATION: The House on May 31st passed the so-called Fis­cal Respon­si­bil­i­ty Act (H.R. 3746), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Patrick T. McHen­ry, R‑North Carolina.

The bill would sus­pend the fed­er­al debt lim­it through 2024, can­cel some unspent fund­ing for the Inter­nal Rev­enue Ser­vice and COVID response pro­grams, and cre­ate caps on dis­cre­tionary fed­er­al spend­ing in fis­cal 2024 and fis­cal 2025.

McHen­ry, who helped nego­ti­ate the bill with the White House, con­tend­ed it “con­tains spend­ing cuts that take a step in the right direc­tion toward restor­ing fis­cal san­i­ty in Wash­ing­ton” and curbs reg­u­la­to­ry over­reach by the exec­u­tive branch, while also reform­ing the appro­pri­a­tions process in Congress.

An oppo­nent, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Chip Roy, R‑Texas, said of the bill: “At best, we have a two-year spend­ing freeze that is full of loop­holes and gim­micks that would allow for increased fund­ing for the fed­er­al bureau­cra­cy in order to receive a $4 tril­lion increase in the debt by Jan­u­ary 1, 2025.”

The vote, on May 31st, was 314 yeas to 117 nays.

A yes vote was to send the leg­is­la­tion to the Senate.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Earl Blu­me­nauer and Andrea Sali­nas; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Cliff Bentz and Lori Chavez-DeRemer

Vot­ing Nay (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci and Val Hoyle

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (9): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Marie Glue­senkamp Perez, Derek Kilmer, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Vot­ing Nay (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Prami­la Jayapal

Cas­ca­dia total: 14 yea votes, 4 nay votes

DEFINING SMALL COMPANIES: The House on May 30th passed the Small Enti­ty Update Act (H.R. 2792), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Ann Wag­n­er, R‑Missouri, to require the Secu­ri­ties and Exchange Com­mis­sion to update, every five years, its def­i­n­i­tion of “small enti­ty” for the pur­pos­es of regulation.

Wag­n­er said the require­ment “will lead to a more tar­get­ed reg­u­la­to­ry frame­work for these enti­ties and help make the Amer­i­can Dream a real­i­ty for all entre­pre­neurs.” The vote was 367 yeas to 8 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (6): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Val Hoyle, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Andrea Sali­nas; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Cliff Bentz and Lori Chavez-DeRemer

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Marie Glue­senkamp Perez, Derek Kilmer, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Not Vot­ing (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Rick Larsen and Prami­la Jayapal

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 yea votes, 3 not voting

SHAREHOLDER VOTING PRACTICES: The House on May 30th passed the Enhanc­ing Mul­ti-Class Share Dis­clo­sures Act (H.R. 2795), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Gre­go­ry W. Meeks, D‑New York. Under the bill, a pub­licly trad­ed com­pa­ny that has mul­ti­ple class­es of share­hold­ers, with dif­fer­ing amounts of pow­er over the com­pa­ny, would be required to pro­vide more infor­ma­tion about those class­es of share­hold­ers. Meeks said: “More robust infor­ma­tion is always best for investors. This bill will ensure that Main Street can make an informed deci­sion as they look to invest in tomor­row’s next suc­cess­ful business.”

The vote was 347 yeas to 30 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (6): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Val Hoyle, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Andrea Sali­nas; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Cliff Bentz and Lori Chavez-DeRemer

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Marie Glue­senkamp Perez, Derek Kilmer, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Not Vot­ing (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Rick Larsen and Prami­la Jayapal

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 yea votes, 3 not voting

INVESTING IN SMALL BUSINESS: The House on May 30th passed the Pro­mot­ing Oppor­tu­ni­ties for Non-Tra­di­tion­al Cap­i­tal For­ma­tion Act (H.R. 2796), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Max­ine Waters, D‑California.

The bill would require a Secu­ri­ties and Exchange Com­mis­sion (SEC) office for invest­ment in small busi­ness to expand efforts to help some types of small busi­ness, includ­ing those in rur­al areas and those hurt by nat­ur­al dis­as­ters, raise pri­vate cap­i­tal. Waters said it “will encour­age the SEC to bet­ter serve the needs of under­served small busi­ness­es, coor­di­nate bet­ter with state reg­u­la­tors, all the while pro­tect­ing investors.” The vote was 309 yeas to 67 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (6): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Val Hoyle, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Andrea Sali­nas; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Cliff Bentz and Lori Chavez-DeRemer

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Marie Glue­senkamp Perez, Derek Kilmer,  Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Not Vot­ing (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Rick Larsen and Prami­la Jayapal

Cas­ca­dia total: 14 yea votes, 1 nay vote, 3 not voting

RECOGNIZING JEWISH CONTRIBUTIONS TO AMERICAN SOCIETY: The House on May 31st passed a res­o­lu­tion (H. Res. 382), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Deb­bie Wasser­man Schultz, D‑Florida, rec­og­niz­ing the con­tri­bu­tions Jews have made to Amer­i­can soci­ety and call­ing on civic, polit­i­cal, and reli­gious lead­ers to oppose anti-Semi­tism. Wasser­man Schultz said: “While this res­o­lu­tion will not stop hate or anti-Semi­tism in its tracks, it uses the full voice of Con­gress to say that there is more that unites us than divides us.”

The vote was unan­i­mous with 429 yeas.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (6): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Val Hoyle, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Andrea Sali­nas; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Cliff Bentz and Lori Chavez-DeRemer

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (10):  Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Marie Glue­senkamp Perez, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 18 yea votes

QUALIFYING PRIVATE INVESTORS: The House on May 31st passed the Equal Oppor­tu­ni­ty for All Investors Act (H.R. 2797), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Flood, R‑Nebraska, to expand eli­gi­bil­i­ty for indi­vid­u­als to qual­i­fy as an accred­it­ed investor, eli­gi­ble to pur­chase pri­vate­ly offered secu­ri­ties, by pass­ing an exam­i­na­tion from the Secu­ri­ties and Exchange Commission.

Flood said the change “brings more investors into the accred­it­ed investor pool but also con­tains guardrails that would fil­ter out indi­vid­u­als that do not ful­ly under­stand pri­vate offer­ings and the invest­ment risks asso­ci­at­ed with them.”

The vote was 383 yeas to 18 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Val Hoyle, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Andrea Sali­nas; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Lori Chavez-DeRemer

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (9): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Marie Glue­senkamp Perez, Derek Kilmer, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Vot­ing Nay (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Prami­la Jayapal

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 yea votes, 1 nay vote, 2 not voting

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate

The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

BUDGET, DEBT LIMIT RANSOM DEMAND LEGISLATION: The Sen­ate on June 1st passed the so-called Fis­cal Respon­si­bil­i­ty Act (H.R. 3746), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Patrick T. McHen­ry, R‑North Car­oli­na. The bill would sus­pend the fed­er­al debt lim­it through 2024, can­cel some unspent fund­ing for the Inter­nal Rev­enue Ser­vice and COVID response pro­grams, and cre­ate caps on dis­cre­tionary fed­er­al spend­ing in fis­cal 2024 and fis­cal 2025. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Chuck Grass­ley, R‑Iowa, called the bill “a bipar­ti­san agree­ment to address the debt ceil­ing while impos­ing mean­ing­ful brakes on gov­ern­ment spend­ing largess.”

A bill oppo­nent, Sen­a­tor James Lank­ford, R‑Oklahoma, said its spend­ing reduc­tions were inad­e­quate and could be illu­so­ry due to var­i­ous escape pro­vi­sions and the abil­i­ty of future Con­gress­es to erase caps on spend­ing after 2025.

The vote was 63 yeas to 36 nays.

A yes vote was to send the leg­is­la­tion to Pres­i­dent Biden, who signed it into law.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tor Ron Wyden

Vot­ing Nay (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tor Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 3 yea votes, 3 nay votes

REPUBLICAN SCHEME TO CUT ESSENTIAL SERVICES EVEN FURTHER: The Sen­ate on June 1st reject­ed an amend­ment spon­sored by Sen­a­tor Dan Sul­li­van, R‑Alaska, to the Fis­cal Respon­si­bil­i­ty Act (H.R. 3746, above), that would have reduced fund­ing for the Inter­nal Rev­enue Ser­vice while increas­ing fund­ing for the Defense Depart­ment. Sul­li­van said more mil­i­tary fund­ing was need­ed because of haz­ards cre­at­ed by Rus­sia and oth­er adver­saries, “and yet this bill cuts defense spend­ing in infla­tion-adjust­ed terms by approx­i­mate­ly three per­cent this year and 5 per­cent next year.”

An oppo­nent, Sen. Ron Wyden, D‑Oregon, said: “At a time when Con­gress is sup­posed to be debat­ing fis­cal respon­si­bil­i­ty, this amend­ment dou­ble counts bil­lions and bil­lions of dol­lars by increas­ing the deficit with more spend­ing on defense con­trac­tors and big­ger hand­outs to wealthy tax cheats.” The vote was 49 yeas to 48 nays, with a three-fifths major­i­ty required for approval.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 2 yea votes, 4 nay votes

KICKING AMERICANS OFF NUTRITION ASSISTANCE: The Sen­ate on June 1st reject­ed an amend­ment spon­sored by Sen­a­tor John Kennedy, R‑Louisiana, to the so-called Fis­cal Respon­si­bil­i­ty Act (H.R. 3746, above), that would have made per­ma­nent a require­ment for sin­gle adults to be employed in order to receive food stamp ben­e­fits. Kennedy said of the ben­e­fit of a work require­ment: “The best social pro­gram is a job. Free enter­prise has lift­ed more peo­ple out of pover­ty than all the social pro­grams put togeth­er.” An amend­ment oppo­nent, Sen­a­tor Deb­bie Stabenow, D‑Mich., said “it is very irre­spon­si­ble for us to change some­thing” in the bill and cre­ate the risk of default­ing on the fed­er­al debt by delay­ing a lift­ing of the debt ceil­ing. The vote, on June 1, was 46 yeas to 51 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 2 yea votes, 4 nay votes

REMOVING COVID FUNDING: The Sen­ate on June 1st reject­ed an amend­ment spon­sored by Sen­a­tor Ted Budd, R‑North Car­oli­na, to the Fis­cal Respon­si­bil­i­ty Act (H.R. 3746, above), that would have can­celled unspent fund­ing for COVID relief pro­grams. Budd said: “If we real­ly want the Fis­cal Respon­si­bil­i­ty Act to live up to its name, the least we can do is to rescind the tax­pay­er dol­lars that remain to fight a pan­dem­ic that every­one knows is over.” An oppo­nent, Sen­a­tor Ron Wyden, D‑Oregon, said: “This amend­ment would take an ax to near­ly all of the fund­ing in the Recov­ery Act and sev­er­al oth­er COVID bills, even if the com­mu­ni­ties are still depend­ing or plan­ning on using that money.”

The vote was 47 yeas to 52 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 2 yea votes, 4 nay votes

DARREL PAPILLION, U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate on May 30th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Dar­rel Papil­lion to be a judge on the U.S. Dis­trict Court for the East­ern Dis­trict of Louisiana. Papil­lion has been a pri­vate prac­tice lawyer in Baton Rogue for more than two decades, focused on civ­il and com­mer­cial law, includ­ing injury and wrong­ful death cases.

A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Dick Durbin, D‑Illinois, said Papil­lion “has deep ties to Louisiana and decades of legal expe­ri­ence that will serve him well on the fed­er­al bench.” The vote was 59 yeas to 31 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Sen­a­tor Mike Crapo

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Sen­a­tor Jim Risch

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Yea (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Yea (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 yea votes, 1 nay vote, 1 not voting

FORCING STUDENTS TO REPAY LOANS: The Sen­ate on June 1st passed a Repub­li­can res­o­lu­tion (H.J. Res. 45), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Bob Good, R‑Virgini, to dis­ap­prove of and void an Edu­ca­tion Depart­ment rule issued last Octo­ber that sus­pend­ed or can­celled pay­ments on stu­dent loans.

A res­o­lu­tion sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor John Cornyn, R‑Texas, said: “It is fun­da­men­tal­ly unfair to expect tax­pay­ers with zero stu­dent debt to cov­er the cost of some­one else’s degree.” An oppo­nent, Sen­a­tor Eliz­a­beth War­ren, D‑Massachusetts, called it a move “to force near­ly 40 mil­lion hard­work­ing Amer­i­cans to imme­di­ate­ly pay back months of stu­dent loan pay­ments and inter­est and restore an esti­mat­ed $20 bil­lion of stu­dent debt to the bal­ances of tens of thou­sands of pub­lic servants.”

The vote was 52 yeas to 46 nays. A yes vote was to send the res­o­lu­tion to Pres­i­dent Joe Biden, who has promised to veto it.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Yea (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 2 yea votes, 4 nay votes

Key votes ahead

Repub­li­cans in the House are plan­ning to vote on a “mes­sag­ing bill” that will embrace stove­tops that burn petro­le­um gas.

The Sen­ate will work on exec­u­tive and judi­cial nominations.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2023 Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice, LLC. 

Adjacent posts

  • Enjoyed what you just read? Make a donation


    Thank you for read­ing The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate, the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute’s jour­nal of world, nation­al, and local politics.

    Found­ed in March of 2004, The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate has been help­ing peo­ple through­out the Pacif­ic North­west and beyond make sense of cur­rent events with rig­or­ous analy­sis and thought-pro­vok­ing com­men­tary for more than fif­teen years. The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate is fund­ed by read­ers like you and trust­ed spon­sors. We don’t run ads or pub­lish con­tent in exchange for money.

    Help us keep The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate edi­to­ri­al­ly inde­pen­dent and freely avail­able to all by becom­ing a mem­ber of the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute today. Or make a dona­tion to sus­tain our essen­tial research and advo­ca­cy journalism.

    Your con­tri­bu­tion will allow us to con­tin­ue bring­ing you fea­tures like Last Week In Con­gress, live cov­er­age of events like Net­roots Nation or the Demo­c­ra­t­ic Nation­al Con­ven­tion, and reviews of books and doc­u­men­tary films.

    Become an NPI mem­ber Make a one-time donation

One Comment

  1. Thank you for the arti­cle! Love this week­ly series.

    # by Zidane Jons :: June 13th, 2023 at 8:08 PM
  • NPI’s essential research and advocacy is sponsored by: