NPI's Cascadia Advocate

Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's unconventional perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Sunday, December 15th, 2019

Last Week In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. lawmakers voted (December 9th-13th)

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Mem­bers of Con­gress vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing Fri­day, Decem­ber 13th.

In the United States House of Representatives

Chamber of the United States House of Representatives

The House cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress pho­to)

REQUIRING NEGOTIATION OF MEDICARE DRUG PRICES: Vot­ing 230 for and 192 against, the House on Decem­ber 12th passed a bill (H.R. 3) that would require phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal com­pa­nies to nego­ti­ate with the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment the prices of approx­i­mate­ly two hun­dred and fifty top-sell­ing pre­scrip­tion drugs offered in Medicare Part D and employ­er health plans.

The nego­ti­at­ed U.S. retail price of a cov­ered drug could not exceed 120 per­cent of the aver­age price that Aus­tralia, Cana­da, France, Ger­many, Japan and the Unit­ed King­dom have nego­ti­at­ed for their res­i­dents.

Man­u­fac­tur­ers declin­ing to nego­ti­ate the price of spe­cif­ic drugs would be sub­ject­ed to excise tax­es of up to 95 per­cent on sales of that drug.

The bill would cap Medicare Part D out-of-pock­et costs at $2,000 per year and add den­tal, vision and hear­ing ben­e­fits to Medicare Part D.

Man­u­fac­tur­ers and the Depart­ment of Health and Human Ser­vices would start nego­ti­a­tions in 2021, with Medicare Part D receiv­ing its first price cuts in 2023.

Nego­tia­tors would add at least fifty reduced-price drugs to Medicare Part D and com­mer­cial plans each year, with the con­ver­sion com­plet­ed by 2026.

Nego­ti­at­ed prices would be indexed for infla­tion and remain in effect until a gener­ic or biosim­i­lar com­peti­tor emerges. Low­er insulin prices for seniors would be nego­ti­at­ed in the law’s first year.

Thomas Suozzi, D‑New York, said: “For too long, ‘Big Phar­ma’ has cashed in because our gov­ern­ment, the largest pur­chas­er of pre­scrip­tion drugs in the world, has been pro­hib­it­ed from nego­ti­at­ing low­er drug prices. Amer­i­cans pay near­ly four times as much for pre­scrip­tion drugs as peo­ple in oth­er coun­tries.”

Kevin Brady, R‑Texas, called the bill “a dan­ger­ous trade­off of low­er drug prices in the short term but few­er life­sav­ing cures in the future, and not just a few cures lost, but many….up to 38 cures lost, accord­ing to the Con­gres­sion­al Bud­get Office, and up to 100, accord­ing to the Coun­cil of Eco­nom­ic Advis­ers.”

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simp­son

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 12 aye votes, 5 nay votes

DEFEATING REPUBLICANS’ FAUX PLAN FOR REDUCING DRUG PRICES: Vot­ing 201 for and 223 against, the House on Decem­ber 12th defeat­ed a Repub­li­can ver­sion of H.R. 3 (above) that omit­ted the require­ment for man­u­fac­tur­ers to nego­ti­ate drug prices with DHHS.

In addi­tion to this “free-mar­ket” pro­vi­sion, the Repub­li­can sub­sti­tute would:

  • cap Medicare Part D out-of-pock­et costs at $3,100 per year;
  • expand finan­cial incen­tives for drug com­pa­nies to dis­cov­er cures;
  • cap the cost of insulin for seniors at $50 per month;
  • require drug adver­tis­ing to list retail prices;
  • expand the use of Health Sav­ings Accounts for drug pur­chas­es;
  • and require the U.S. trade rep­re­sen­ta­tive to ensure U.S. tax­pay­ers do not sub­si­dize the drug costs in for­eign mar­kets.

The Repub­li­can plan also pro­posed per­ma­nent­ly cap­ping the IRS thresh­old for deduct­ing med­ical expens­es at 7.5 per­cent of adjust­ed gross income, avert­ing a sched­uled increase to ten per­cent in 2020.

Robert Lat­ta, R‑Ohio, said the GOP plan “low­ers the costs of pre­scrip­tion drugs and caps seniors’ out-of-pock­et costs. It encour­ages inno­va­tion and will increase com­pe­ti­tion, while enhanc­ing trans­paren­cy and get­ting more gener­ic med­i­cines to mar­ket faster. The Amer­i­can peo­ple deserve solu­tions that will be signed into law.”

Anna Eshoo, D‑Calif., asked: “So what is the dif­fer­ence between what the Repub­li­cans are say­ing and what the Democ­rats are say­ing? At the core [our bill] is that there will be direct nego­ti­a­tions with the drug man­u­fac­tur­ers to bring the price of drugs down. Our Repub­li­can friends do not sup­port that.”

A yes vote was to adopt the Repub­li­can alter­na­tive.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Mike Simp­son and Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden; Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Kurt Schrad­er

Vot­ing Nay (3): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Peter DeFazio

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Vot­ing Nay (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck

Cas­ca­dia total: 7 aye votes, 10 nay votes

ENSURING INNOVATION IN DRUG RESEARCH: Vot­ing 196 for and 226 against, the House on Decem­ber 12th defeat­ed a Repub­li­can motion that would pre­vent core pro­vi­sions of HR 3 (above) from tak­ing effect until after the sec­re­tary of Health and Human Ser­vices has cer­ti­fied that the law would not reduce the num­ber of appli­ca­tions from inno­va­tors seek­ing to put new drugs on the mar­ket.

Fred Upton, R‑Michigan, said Repub­li­cans “want to make sure that we have the resources to devel­op the cures that all of us want for the thou­sands of dis­eases where we don’t have a cure.”

Cas­ca­di­a’s very own Dr. Kim Schri­er, D‑Washington, said: “We absolute­ly must remain the leader in the world in inno­va­tion, but the thing is, we can reduce drug prices and still have mon­ey for research.”

A yes vote was to adopt the motion.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Mike Simp­son  and Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

Vot­ing Nay (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Vot­ing Nay (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck

Cas­ca­dia total: 6 aye votes, 11 nay votes

OVERHAULING VISAS FOR FARM WORKERS: Vot­ing 266 for and 165 against, the House on Decem­ber 11th passed a bill (H.R. 5038) that would over­haul the H‑2A visa pro­gram, which admits undoc­u­ment­ed migrants for tem­po­rary U.S. agri­cul­tur­al jobs the domes­tic work­force is unable or unwill­ing to fill. Over time, the bill could enable hun­dreds of thou­sands of these work­ers to apply for legal res­i­den­cy for them­selves, spous­es and minor chil­dren.

In addi­tion to meet­ing labor short­ages, the bill would grant up to 40,000 Green Cards annu­al­ly to those who com­plete a lengthy path to per­ma­nent sta­tus and estab­lish a manda­to­ry fed­er­al “E‑Verify” sys­tem by which agri­cul­tur­al employ­ers could deter­mine work­ers’ immi­gra­tion sta­tus.

Under the bill, migrants employed in U.S. farm work for at least 180 days over the two pre­ced­ing years would qual­i­fy for Cer­ti­fied Agri­cul­tur­al Work­er sta­tus, which they could con­tin­u­al­ly renew by work­ing at least 100 days annu­al­ly in farm jobs.

In addi­tion, new Amer­i­cans (and spous­es and minor chil­dren) employed in U.S. agri­cul­ture before the law takes effect would qual­i­fy to pur­sue legal sta­tus. Those with at least 10 years of pre-enact­ment farm employ­ment could apply for per­ma­nent res­i­den­cy by pay­ing a $1,000 fine and work­ing four more years; those with few­er than ten years would have to pay the fine and work eight more years. All appli­cants would have to clear crim­i­nal and nation­al-secu­ri­ty back­ground checks.

The bill would freeze over­all migrant farm work­ers’ pay for one year, then allow wages to rise by 3.25 per­cent annu­al­ly over the next nine years; autho­rize up to 20,000 H‑2A visas annu­al­ly for jobs at year-round oper­a­tions includ­ing dairies; expand the avail­abil­i­ty of migrant hous­ing; and require medi­a­tion in place of law­suits to resolve dis­putes under a 1983 migrant work­place law.

Zoe Lof­gren, D‑California, said:

“We have farm work­ers who have been here for a very long time with­out their papers, liv­ing in fear, and in some cas­es, being arrest­ed and deport­ed. We need to allow them to get an agri­cul­tur­al-work­er visa that is tem­po­rary and renew­able so they can do the work…that their employ­ers need them to do.”

Tom McClin­tock, R‑California, said:

“I under­stand agriculture’s need for labor,” but this bill “ignores enforce­ment and rewards any­one who has ille­gal­ly crossed our bor­ders, both with amnesty and a spe­cial path to cit­i­zen­ship, as long as they claim to have worked part-time in the agri­cul­ture sec­tor for the last two years.”

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Mike Simp­son and Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

APPROVING $738 BILLION FOR MILITARY IN 2020: Vot­ing 377 for and 48 against, the House on Decem­ber 11th adopt­ed the con­fer­ence report on a $738 bil­lion mil­i­tary pol­i­cy bud­get (S. 1790) for fis­cal 2020, includ­ing $69 bil­lion for com­bat oper­a­tions and more than $57 bil­lion for active-duty and retiree health care. Also known as the 2019 Nation­al Defense Autho­riza­tion Act, this bill:

  • sets a 3.1 per­cent pay raise for uni­formed per­son­nel;
  • con­fronts glob­al warm­ing as a nation­al-secu­ri­ty threat;
  • requires Pen­ta­gon strate­gies for coun­ter­ing Russ­ian inter­fer­ence in U.S. elec­tions;
  • … and funds pro­grams for mil­i­tary vic­tims of sex­u­al assault.

In addi­tion, the bill cre­ates the U.S. Space Force as the sixth branch of the mil­i­tary; ends the “wid­ow’s tax” on Pen­ta­gon death ben­e­fits received by an esti­mat­ed 65,000 sur­vivors who also receive vet­er­ans’ sur­vivor ben­e­fits and estab­lish­es twelve weeks’ paid fam­i­ly and med­ical leave for the fed­er­al civil­ian work­force to accom­mo­date child­birth, adop­tions, fos­ter care and seri­ous ill­ness­es.

Michael Waltz, R‑Florida, said: “We are in a hot war with extrem­ists around the world, and we are in a cold war with­Russ­ian and Chi­na and oth­er rogue states. If the coun­try isn’t safe, every­thing else that we do in this body is sec­ondary. Our domes­tic pri­or­i­ties, our econ­o­my, our edu­ca­tion, trade, every­thing else that we debate in this Con­gress is at risk if we fail to pro­tect this great nation.”

Ro Khan­na, D‑California, said: “This defense bud­get is $120 bil­lion more than what Pres­i­dent Oba­ma left us with. That could fund free pub­lic col­lege for every Amer­i­can. It could fund access to high-speed, afford­able inter­net for every American.When are we going to do our Arti­cle I duty and stop fund­ing these end­less wars and start fund­ing our domes­tic pri­or­i­ties?”

A yes vote was to approve the fis­cal 2020 mil­i­tary bud­get.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Mike Simp­son and Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (3): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

Vot­ing Nay (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Earl Blu­me­nauer and Peter DeFazio

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (9): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Vot­ing Nay (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Prami­la Jaya­pal

Cas­ca­dia total: 14 aye votes, 3 nay votes

APPROVING MEASURES TO ADDRESS CLIMATE DAMAGE: Vot­ing 262 for and 151 against, the House on Decem­ber 10th approved a ten-bill leg­isla­tive pack­age (H.R. 729) that would autho­rize $1.4 bil­lion over five years for pro­grams to help Atlantic, Pacif­ic and Great Lakes coastal com­mu­ni­ties and cer­tain inland areas deal with the harm­ful effects of cli­mate dam­age.

The pack­age would:

  • tai­lor the 1972 Coastal Zone Man­age­ment Act to address ris­ing sea lev­els;
  • fund a Dig­i­tal Coast Pro­gram for sup­ply­ing data to help com­mu­ni­ties pre­pare for storms and their con­se­quences;
  • fund sci­en­tif­ic ini­tia­tives to con­serve the ecosys­tem and fish pop­u­la­tions of the Great Lakes, which hold eigh­teen per­cent of the world’s fresh water sup­ply and have 9,000 miles of shore­line;
  • pro­mote the use resilient nat­ur­al mate­ri­als instead of hard bar­ri­ers to pro­tect facil­i­ties and ecosys­tems against flood­ing;
  • … and autho­rize loan guar­an­tees in sup­port of eco­nom­ic, cul­tur­al and recre­ation­al “work­ing water­front” projects under­way in many coastal com­mu­ni­ties.

Jared Huff­man, D‑Caliornia, said: “Because of cli­mate change, coastal cities will be dev­as­tat­ed from sea-lev­el rise, and com­mer­cial fish­eries could be either total­ly col­lapsed or moved beyond the reach of our coastal com­mu­ni­ties, all in my chil­dren’s life­times. So, yes, adap­ta­tion and mit­i­ga­tion will be cost­ly, but the cost of doing noth­ing is expo­nen­tial­ly high­er.”

Paul Gosar, R‑Arizona, said the pack­age large­ly dupli­cates exist­ing Nation­al Ocean­ic and Atmos­pher­ic Admin­is­tra­tion pro­grams and asked: “So why are we here? To cre­ate giant…slush funds that future Demo­c­ra­t­ic Con­gress­es work­ing with future Demo­c­ra­t­ic pres­i­dents will have avail­able to fun­nel mon­ey to their schemes to com­bat cli­mate change.”

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simp­son

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 12 aye votes, 5 nay votes

NO REDUCTION OF MARINE MAMMAL PROTECTIONS: Vot­ing 160 for and 259 against, the House on Decem­ber 10th defeat­ed an amend­ment to HR 729 (above) to scale back the 1972 Marine Mam­mal Pro­tec­tion Act in order to speed fed­er­al approval of appli­ca­tions for oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mex­i­co and coastal-restora­tion projects on shore­lines includ­ing Louisiana’s.

The law is designed, in part, to pro­tect whales, dol­phins, por­pois­es and oth­er marine life against mil­i­tary and indus­tri­al sonar test­ing in gulf and ocean­ic U.S. waters. But crit­ics (who are aligned with indus­tries that pol­lute) call it one of sev­er­al over­lap­ping envi­ron­men­tal laws that undu­ly hin­der eco­nom­ic devel­op­ment.

Mike John­son, R‑Louisiana., said: “For any­one to insin­u­ate that this amend­ment will destroy pro­tec­tions and result in wet­land and species decline is sim­ply untrue. In fact, [it] would fur­ther sup­port coastal habi­tats and species restora­tion, U.S. nation­al-secu­ri­ty inter­ests and Amer­i­can ener­gy inde­pen­dence.”

Ed Case, D‑Hawaii, said: “We under­stand that for some indus­tries inter­est­ed in the exploita­tion of our oceans that the Marine Mam­mal Pro­tec­tion Act is incon­ve­nient.”

A yes vote was to adopt the amend­ment.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simp­son

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

Vot­ing Nay (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Vot­ing Nay (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck

Cas­ca­dia total: 5 aye votes, 12 nay votes

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate

The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress pho­to)

CONFIRMING JOHN SULLIVAN AS AMBASSADOR TO RUSSIA: Vot­ing 70 for and 22 against, the Sen­ate on Dec. 12 con­firmed Deputy Sec­re­tary of State John J. Sul­li­van, six­ty, as U.S. ambas­sador to Rus­sia, replac­ing Jon Hunts­man, who resigned in Octo­ber. In addi­tion to hold­ing Depart­ment of State posi­tions in the Trump admin­is­tra­tion, Sul­li­van was Depart­ment of Com­merce gen­er­al coun­sel and Depart­ment of Defense deputy gen­er­al coun­sel under Pres­i­dent George W. Bush, an attor­ney in pri­vate prac­tice and deputy gen­er­al coun­sel to Pres­i­dent George H. W. Bush’s reelec­tion cam­paign in 1992.

A yes vote was to con­firm the nom­i­nee.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tor Jeff Merkley

Vot­ing Nay (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tor Ron Wyden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Mur­ray

Cas­ca­dia total: 3 aye votes, 3 nay votes

STEPHEN HAHN, FOOD AND DRUG COMMISSIONER: Vot­ing 72 for and 18 against, the Sen­ate on Dec. 12 con­firmed Dr. Stephen Hahn, 59, an oncol­o­gist and can­cer researcher, as com­mis­sion­er of the Food and Drug Admin­is­tra­tion (FDA), replac­ing Dr. Scott Got­tlieb, 45, who resigned in March. Hah­n’s nom­i­na­tion proved con­tro­ver­sial over his refusal to endorse fed­er­al reg­u­la­tion of e‑cigarettes.

An active clin­i­cal physi­cian and med­ical admin­is­tra­tor, Hahn leaves the post of chief med­ical exec­u­tive of the MD Ander­son Can­cer Cen­ter in Hous­ton to take charge of the FDA. He worked at the Nation­al Can­cer Insti­tute from 1989–1999, serv­ing as chief of its Prostate Can­cer Clin­ic, among oth­er posi­tions.

A yes vote was to con­firm the nom­i­nee.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Mur­ray

Cas­ca­dia total: 2 aye votes, 4 nay votes

Key votes ahead

The House is expect­ed to vote on arti­cles of impeach­ment against Don­ald Trump dur­ing the week of Decem­ber 16th and may also take up a pro­posed U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade pact, which is fac­ing at least one unex­pect­ed rat­i­fi­ca­tion hur­dle.

The Sen­ate will con­sid­er the 2020 mil­i­tary bud­get and judi­cial nom­i­na­tions.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Votera­ma in Con­gress, a ser­vice of Thomas Vot­ing Reports. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2019 Thomas Vot­ing Reports.

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3 Comments

  1. Learned a lot read­ing this. Cheers from Saska­toon!

    # by Jon Kay :: December 16th, 2019 at 4:46 PM
  2. Thank you for pro­vid­ing this impor­tant ser­vice.

    # by Dole Cameron :: December 17th, 2019 at 8:10 PM
  3. I like how you have pre­sent­ed all this infor­ma­tion. The graph­ics make it eas­i­er to fol­low.

    # by Lisa Su :: December 17th, 2019 at 8:12 PM