NPI's Cascadia Advocate

Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's uplifting perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Sunday, September 11th, 2022

Last Week In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. lawmakers voted (September 6th-9th)

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Unit­ed States Sen­a­tors vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing Fri­day, Sep­tem­ber 9th, 2022.

The House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives was in recess.

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate

The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

JOHN LEE, APPEALS COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate on Sep­tem­ber 7th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of John Z. Lee to be a judge on the U.S. Sev­enth Cir­cuit Court of Appeals. Lee, a judge on the U.S. Dis­trict Court for the North­ern Dis­trict of Illi­nois since 2012,was pre­vi­ous­ly a pri­vate prac­tice lawyer in Chica­go and, in the ear­ly 1990s, a Jus­tice Depart­ment lawyer. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Dick Durbin, D‑Illinois, said of Lee: “Dur­ing his time on the bench, he always applied the law to the facts before him in an even­hand­ed and fair fashion.”

The vote was 50 yeas to 44 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

ANDRE MATHIS, APPEALS COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate on Sep­tem­ber 8th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Andre Math­is to be a judge on the U.S. Sixth Cir­cuit Court of Appeals. Math­is has been a pri­vate prac­tice lawyer in Mem­phis, Tenn., since 2007. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Dick Durbin, D‑Illinois, called Math­is “a per­son of out­stand­ing cre­den­tials and integri­ty to serve the com­mu­ni­ty that raised him.”

The vote was 48 yeas to 47 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

Key votes ahead

The House will recon­vene on Tues­day after a month-long break that was inter­rupt­ed by a vote to pass the Infla­tion Reduc­tion Act. Bills being tak­en up include Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Suzan Del­Bene’s Improv­ing Seniors’ Time­ly Access to Care Act of 2021, the Whistle­blow­er Pro­tec­tion Improve­ment Act of 2021, the Ensur­ing a Fair and Accu­rate Cen­sus Act, and the Pre­vent­ing a Patron­age Sys­tem Act of 2021. Major­i­ty Leader Ste­ny Hoy­er’s office also advised mem­bers that there could be a vote on an appro­pri­a­tions bill for Fis­cal Year 2023.

The Sen­ate is slat­ed to con­tin­ue work­ing on judi­cial nom­i­na­tions. The next nom­i­nee to be con­sid­ered will be a Wash­ing­ton­ian: Sal­vador Men­doza, Jr., who was nom­i­nat­ed to be a Unit­ed States Cir­cuit Judge for the Ninth Cir­cuit. (The Ninth Cir­cuit includes the entire greater Pacif­ic North­west: Wash­ing­ton, Ore­gon, Ida­ho, Mon­tana, and Alas­ka, plus Cal­i­for­nia, Hawaii, Ari­zona, and Nevada.)

The Sen­ate will also move towards con­fir­ma­tion votes on two oth­er appel­late nom­i­nees: Ari­an­na J. Free­man from Penn­syl­va­nia to be Unit­ed States Cir­cuit Judge for the Third Cir­cuit and Lara E. Mon­te­cal­vo from Rhode Island to be Unit­ed States Cir­cuit Judge for the First Cir­cuit. There are a total of 179 judge­ships in the fed­er­al appel­late sys­tem, spread over eleven circuits.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2022 Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice, LLC. 

Adjacent posts

  • Enjoyed what you just read? Make a donation


    Thank you for read­ing The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate, the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute’s jour­nal of world, nation­al, and local politics.

    Found­ed in March of 2004, The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate has been help­ing peo­ple through­out the Pacif­ic North­west and beyond make sense of cur­rent events with rig­or­ous analy­sis and thought-pro­vok­ing com­men­tary for more than fif­teen years. The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate is fund­ed by read­ers like you and trust­ed spon­sors. We don’t run ads or pub­lish con­tent in exchange for money.

    Help us keep The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate edi­to­ri­al­ly inde­pen­dent and freely avail­able to all by becom­ing a mem­ber of the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute today. Or make a dona­tion to sus­tain our essen­tial research and advo­ca­cy journalism.

    Your con­tri­bu­tion will allow us to con­tin­ue bring­ing you fea­tures like Last Week In Con­gress, live cov­er­age of events like Net­roots Nation or the Demo­c­ra­t­ic Nation­al Con­ven­tion, and reviews of books and doc­u­men­tary films.

    Become an NPI mem­ber Make a one-time donation

Submit a Comment

By submitting a comment, you agree to abide by our Commenting Guidelines. If you submit any links to other websites in your comment or in the Website field, these will be published at our discretion. Please read our statement of Privacy Practices before commenting to understand how we collect and use submissions to the Cascadia Advocate. Your comment must be submitted with a name and email address as noted below. We will not publish or share your email address. *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  • NPI’s essential research and advocacy is sponsored by: