Last Week In Congress
Last Week In Congress is a long-running Sunday series on NPI's Cascadia Advocate that helps people across the Pacific Northwest and beyond follow how Washington, Oregon, and Idaho's United States lawmakers voted. The illustration above incorporates photo art depicting the U.S. Capitol from NPI's image library.

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Mem­bers of Con­gress vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing Fri­day, June 24th, 2022.

In the United States House of Representatives

Chamber of the United States House of Representatives
The House cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

BIPARTISAN SAFER COMMUNITIES ACT: The House on June 24th gave final approval to the Bipar­ti­san Safer Com­mu­ni­ties Act (S. 2938), a bill that would estab­lish a vari­ety of mea­sures intend­ed to reduce mass shoot­ings, includ­ing spend­ing on behav­ioral health clin­ics, fund­ing for school safe­ty efforts, and restric­tions on gun own­er­ship by ex-con­victs and those found by a court to be men­tal­ly ill. The bill was giv­en swift con­sid­er­a­tion in the House after over­com­ing a fil­i­buster in the Sen­ate (see below). It was signed into law by Pres­i­dent Joe Biden in a cer­e­mo­ny at the White House yes­ter­day morning.

“This pack­age rep­re­sents the most sig­nif­i­cant action to pre­vent gun vio­lence in near­ly three decades. And it is a nec­es­sary step to hon­or our solemn duty as law­mak­ers to pro­tect and defend the Amer­i­can peo­ple,” said Speak­er Pelosi in a floor speech pri­or to final pas­sage of the leg­is­la­tion.

The vote to send the leg­is­la­tion to Pres­i­dent Biden was 234 yeas to 193 nays. Four­teen Repub­li­cans vot­ed yea, but none of them were from our region.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrader

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strickland

Vot­ing Nay (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 11 aye votes, 6 nay votes

INDUSTRIAL CYBERSECURITY: The House on June 21st passed the Indus­tri­al Con­trol Sys­tems Cyber­se­cu­ri­ty Train­ing Act (H.R. 7777), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Eric Swal­well, D‑California. The bill would estab­lish an effort at the Cyber­se­cu­ri­ty and Infra­struc­ture Secu­ri­ty Agency for train­ing cyber­se­cu­ri­ty work­ers on how to pro­tect indus­tri­al con­trol sys­tems from cyber attacks.

Swal­well said the effort “will help strength­en small busi­ness­es, par­tic­u­lar­ly those in crit­i­cal infra­struc­ture, who do not yet today have cyber­se­cu­ri­ty defense forces receiv­ing that train­ing.” The vote was 368 yeas to 47 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

MENTAL HEALTH: The House on June 22nd passed the Restor­ing Hope for Men­tal Health and Well-Being Act (H.R. 7666), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Frank Pal­lone Jr., D‑New Jer­sey. The bill would reau­tho­rize, through fis­cal 2027, a num­ber of men­tal and behav­ioral health pro­grams, and expand eli­gi­bil­i­ty for enrolling in opi­oid treat­ment pro­grams. Pal­lone said the reau­tho­riza­tion “is going to help to sup­port the men­tal health and well-being of mil­lions of Amer­i­cans, their fam­i­lies, and com­mu­ni­ties for years to come.” The vote was 402 yeas to 20 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

HEALTH INNOVATIONS AGENCY: The House on June 22nd passed the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Health Act (H.R. 5585), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Anna G. Eshoo, D‑California, to cre­ate the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Health agency, which would, like sim­i­lar exist­ing agen­cies for the mil­i­tary and ener­gy, fund research into nov­el health and med­i­cine technologies.

Eshoo said of her hopes for the agency: “Even if one dead­ly dis­ease is addressed and cured, we will have suc­ceed­ed. I think we are going to do bet­ter than that.”

The vote was 336 yeas to 85 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrader

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 aye votes, 2 nay votes

ACTIVE SHOOTER ALERT ACT: The House on June 22nd reject­ed the Active Shoot­er Alert Act (H.R. 6538), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive David Cicilline, D‑Rhode Island The bill pro­posed the estab­lish­ment of an Active Shoot­er Alert Com­mu­ni­ca­tions Net­work at the Jus­tice Depart­ment, and have the net­work make plans for send­ing alerts about active shoot­ers by work­ing with local and state gov­ern­ments. Cicilline said that by using fed­er­al resources to set up an alert sys­tem, the net­work “will pro­vide access to an impor­tant tool for law enforce­ment depart­ments across the coun­try, regard­less of their size or location.”

An oppo­nent, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jim Jor­dan, R‑Ohio, said state and local gov­ern­ments already had ade­quate alert sys­tems, and a fed­er­al pro­gram would be used not for pub­lic safe­ty, but to fur­ther “Demo­c­rat fear-mon­ger­ing that guns are ever-present threats.” The vote was 259 yeas to 162 nays, with a two-thirds thresh­old required for approval.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrader

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 aye votes, 2 nay votes

SCHOOL MEALS: The House on June 23rd passed the Keep Kids Fed Act (S. 2089), spon­sored by Sen­a­tor Jeanne Sha­heen, D‑New Hamp­shire. The bill would extend waivers for fed­er­al child nutri­tion pro­grams that were first issued in response to clos­ing school class­rooms in ear­ly 2020 and have been used to pro­vide free school meals, sum­mer meals, and sub­si­dies for child­care. A sup­port­er, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Bob­by Scott, D‑Virginia, said the exten­sions “would take a crit­i­cal step to sup­port child nutri­tion pro­grams and pre­vent chil­dren from going hun­gry dur­ing the ongo­ing pub­lic health emergency.”

The vote was 376 yeas to 42 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

MENTAL HEALTH AT COLLEGES: The House on June 23rd passed the Enhanc­ing Men­tal Health and Sui­cide Pre­ven­tion Through Cam­pus Plan­ning Act (H.R. 5407), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Susan Wild, D‑Pennsylvania, to require the Edu­ca­tion Depart­ment to pro­mote men­tal health and sui­cide pre­ven­tion plans at col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties. Wild said of the need for such plans: “In the last sev­er­al years, young Amer­i­cans have faced unprece­dent­ed chal­lenges result­ing in a rise in men­tal health needs.” The vote was 405 yeas to 16 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

COLLEGIATE DRUG USE: The House on June 23rd passed the Cam­pus Pre­ven­tion and Recov­ery Ser­vices for Stu­dents Act (H.R. 6493), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Tere­sa Leg­er Fer­nan­dez, D‑New Mexico.

The bill would reau­tho­rize, through fis­cal 2028, the fed­er­al illic­it drug and alco­hol abuse pre­ven­tion pro­gram for col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties, and pro­vide $15 mil­lion of annu­al fund­ing for grants and oth­er efforts to pre­vent alco­hol and sub­stance mis­use at those campuses.

Leg­er Fer­nan­dez said it “will help to cut the chains of addic­tion and unlock access to treat­ment and pre­ven­tion for count­less stu­dents across the Unit­ed States.”

The vote was 371 yeas to 49 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

INCLUSIVE DATA PRACTICES: The House on June 23rd passed the LGBTQI+ Data Inclu­sion Act (H.R. 4176), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Raul Gri­jal­va, D‑Arizona. The bill would require fed­er­al agen­cies to include infor­ma­tion about peo­ple who aren’t straight in sur­veys that cov­er demo­graph­ic data.

Gri­jal­va said: “The LGBTQI+ com­mu­ni­ty deserves to be vis­i­ble and heard so pub­lic pol­i­cy can bet­ter reflect their needs.”

An oppo­nent, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive James Com­er, R‑Kentucky, said: “Fed­er­al sur­veys are no place to con­front the Amer­i­can peo­ple or their chil­dren with intru­sive ques­tions and con­cerns about sex­u­al ori­en­ta­tion or gen­der identity.”

The vote was 220 yeas to 201 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrader

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strickland

Vot­ing Nay (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 11 aye votes, 6 nay votes

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate
The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

COMBATING GUN VIOLENCE: The Sen­ate on June 23rd agreed to pass the Bipar­ti­san Safer Com­mu­ni­ties Act (S. 2938, above) that would estab­lish a vari­ety of mea­sures intend­ed to reduce mass shoot­ings, includ­ing spend­ing on behav­ioral health clin­ics, fund­ing for school safe­ty efforts, and restric­tions on gun own­er­ship by ex-con­victs and those found by a court to be men­tal­ly ill.

A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor John Cornyn, R‑Texas, said the amend­ment sought to “cre­ate real changes in com­mu­ni­ties across this country–safer, health­i­er com­mu­ni­ties; stronger, more secure schools; sav­ing lives.” An oppo­nent, Sen­a­tor Rand Paul, R‑Kentucky, argued that the restric­tions would infringe “the con­sti­tu­tion­al right to bear arms for the inno­cent.” The vote was 65 yeas to 33 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

ANA ISABEL DE ALBA, U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate has con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Ana Isabel de Alba to be a judge on the U.S. dis­trict court for the east­ern dis­trict of Cal­i­for­nia. de Alba has been a supe­ri­or court judge in Fres­no Coun­ty since 2018; for a decade pre­vi­ous, she was a pri­vate prac­tice lawyer. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Alex Padil­la, D‑California, called de Alba “a ded­i­cat­ed, fair, and uni­ver­sal­ly respect­ed pub­lic ser­vant, respect­ed by her colleagues.”

The vote, on June 21st, was 53 yeas to 45 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

MARY BOYLE, CONSUMER PRODUCTS COMMISSIONER: The Sen­ate has con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Mary Boyle to be on the Con­sumer Prod­uct Safe­ty Com­mis­sion (CPSC) for a 7‑year term end­ing in fall 2025. Boyle, cur­rent­ly the com­mis­sion’s exec­u­tive direc­tor, has been at the CPSC for more than a decade.

A sup­port­er, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D‑Minnesota, said Boyle “is deeply knowl­edge­able about con­sumer prod­uct safe­ty and the func­tion­ing of the CPSC. I have every con­fi­dence that she will be ready to lead on day one.”

An oppo­nent, Sen­a­tor Roger Wick­er, R‑Mississippi, cit­ed “sig­nif­i­cant con­cerns about major admin­is­tra­tive fail­ures at the agency dur­ing Ms. Boyle’s tenure as exec­u­tive direc­tor there, includ­ing the improp­er dis­clo­sure of unredact­ed man­u­fac­tur­er and con­sumer data.” The vote was 50 yeas to 48 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

ADDITIONAL SENATE VOTE: Along with the week’s roll call votes, the Sen­ate also passed one mea­sure by voice vote: the Fix­ing Our Reg­u­la­to­ry May­hem Upset­ting Lit­tle Amer­i­cans Act (S. 4261), to sus­pend duties and oth­er restric­tions on the impor­ta­tion of infant for­mu­la to address the short­age of infant for­mu­la in the Unit­ed States. The long name allows the bill to have the acronym “FORMULA.”

LWIC will be on hiatus until mid-July

The House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives and Sen­ate have begun their Inde­pen­dence Day recess­es, so Last Week In Con­gress will be on hia­tus for the next two Sundays.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2022 Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice, LLC. 

About the author

Targeted News Service provides comprehensive public policy coverage of government activities at the federal, congressional and state level, including weekly voting reports for NPI's Last Week In Congress series. TNS' president and editor Myron Struck has been a professional journalist since 1973, working for The Washington Post, Miami Herald, Manassas (Virginia) Journal-Messenger, Prince William (Virginia) Journal, Defense News, Defense Electronics, Roll Call, States News Service, CCH Publications (TaxDay), CD Publications and Campaigns & Elections Magazine.

Adjacent posts