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Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's uplifting perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Sunday, April 3rd, 2022

Last Week In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. lawmakers voted (March 28th – April 1st)

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Mem­bers of Con­gress vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing Fri­day, March 18th, 2022.

In the United States House of Representatives

Chamber of the United States House of Representatives

The House cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

FAIRER INSULIN PRICING: The House on March 31st passed the Afford­able Insulin Now Act (H.R. 6833), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Ang­ie Craig, D‑Minnesota, to cap an insured indi­vid­u­al’s pay­ments for insulin under Medicare or pri­vate insur­ance plans. Craig called a cap “an oppor­tu­ni­ty to save Amer­i­can fam­i­lies thou­sands of their hard-earned dollars.”

An oppo­nent, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Vir­ginia Foxx, R‑North Car­oli­na, said: “This bill will low­er out-of-pock­et costs for insulin for a minor­i­ty of Amer­i­cans by bloat­ing pre­mi­ums and oth­er health­care costs for the major­i­ty of Amer­i­cans and leave our health­care sys­tem worse off.” The vote was 232 yeas to 193 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrader

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jaime Her­rera Beutler

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 12 aye votes, 5 nay votes

REMOVING ACQUITTALS FROM BEING A FACTOR IN SENTENCING: The House on March 28th passed the Pro­hibit­ing Pun­ish­ment of Acquit­ted Con­duct Act (H.R. 1621), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Steve Cohen, D‑Tennessee, to pre­vent fed­er­al courts from con­sid­er­ing acquit­tals when sen­tenc­ing crim­i­nals to prison sen­tences. Cohen said the bar “would ensure that no one spends time in jail for con­duct pros­e­cu­tors were not able to prove at trial.”

The vote was 405 yeas to 12 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

Not Vot­ing (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Peter DeFazio

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 16 aye votes; 1 not voting

STATUES OF FEMALE JUSTICES: The House has passed a bill (S. 3294), spon­sored by Sen­a­tor Amy Klobuchar, D‑Minnesota, to place stat­ues of Supreme Court jus­tices San­dra Day O’Con­nor and Ruth Bad­er Gins­burg in the Unit­ed States Capi­tol. A sup­port­er, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Stan­ton, D‑Arizona, said: “Both over­came for­mi­da­ble bar­ri­ers and defied the odds, paving the way for future gen­er­a­tions of women.” The vote was 349 yeas to 63 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

COAST GUARD APPROPRIATIONS: The House on March 29th passed the Don Young Coast Guard Autho­riza­tion Act (H.R. 6865), spon­sored by Rep. Peter A. DeFazio, D‑Oregon, to autho­rize fis­cal 2022 and 2023 spend­ing on the Coast Guard. DeFazio said bill mea­sures would “begin to address sev­er­al unfair ship­ping prac­tices that have con­tributed to infla­tion across every sec­tor of the Amer­i­can econ­o­my” by more aggres­sive­ly reg­u­lat­ing the ship­ping industry.

The vote was 378 yeas to 46 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 16 aye votes, 1 nay vote

LEGAL FRAMEWORK FOR COLD CASES: The House on March 29th passed the Homi­cide Vic­tims Fam­i­lies Rights Act (H.R. 3359), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Eric Swal­well, D‑California, to cre­ate a legal frame­work for the imme­di­ate rel­a­tives of mur­der vic­tims who were killed more than three years ago to request that a rel­e­vant fed­er­al agency review the case file for the killing.

Swal­well said chang­ing cir­cum­stances since a mur­der case went cold can jus­ti­fy a new review and effort at “iden­ti­fy­ing new leads and wit­ness­es to solve crimes and obtain jus­tice that vic­tims’ fam­i­lies and loved ones so right­ful­ly deserve.”

The vote was 406 yeas to 20 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

Not Vot­ing (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Peter DeFazio

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 16 aye votes, 1 not voting

COVID ORAL HISTORIES: The House has passed the COVID-19 Amer­i­can His­to­ry Project Act (H.R. 4738), spon­sored by Rep. Julia Let­low, R‑La., to fund an oral his­to­ry project at the Amer­i­can Folk­life Cen­ter at the Library of Con­gress. The project would gath­er sto­ries from peo­ple who con­tract­ed SARS-CoV­‑2 and whose rel­a­tives died from COVID-19, and health­care work­ers. Let­low said the project “will allow us to use our voic­es as cit­i­zens to write the his­to­ry of this time. Per­son­al sto­ries are pow­er­ful and can pro­mote heal­ing while also help­ing oth­ers who are hurt­ing.” The vote was 376 yeas to 47 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

PROTECTING PUBLIC TRANSIT PASSENGERS: The House has passed the Stop Sex­u­al Assault and Harass­ment in Trans­porta­tion Act (H.R. 5706), spon­sored by Rep. Peter A. DeFazio, D‑Ore. The bill would require trans­porta­tion providers to estab­lish poli­cies for han­dling sex­u­al assault and sex­u­al harass­ment, and estab­lish report­ing and dis­clo­sure require­ments for such incidents.

DeFazio said: “We can no longer allow sex­u­al vio­lence and abuse to per­sist on our roads, our waters, or in our skies. We must ensure our trans­porta­tion sys­tem is safe for those who work in it and those who wish to use it.”

The vote was 339 yeas to 85 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 16 aye votes, 1 nay vote

REQUIRING DETAILS IN GRANT APPLICATIONS: The House on March 30th passed the Care is an Eco­nom­ic Devel­op­ment Strat­e­gy Act (H.R. 5547), spon­sored by Rep. Nike­ma Williams, D‑Ga., to require appli­cants for fed­er­al grants to explain how they plan to use the fund­ing to increase their pro­vi­sion of afford­able, qual­i­ty, care-based ser­vices. Williams said: “Invest­ing in care will help get peo­ple back to work, cre­ate good-pay­ing jobs, and cre­ate a stronger econ­o­my for every­one.” The vote, on March 30, was 304 yeas to 122 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrader

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 aye votes, 2 nay votes

NEGOTIATING ECONOMIC STRATEGY LEGISLATION: The House on March 31st passed a motion to instruct con­fer­ees with the Sen­ate on nego­ti­at­ing the two cham­bers’ ver­sions of the Amer­i­ca COMPETES Act (H.R. 4521), which would increase spend­ing on var­i­ous U.S. eco­nom­ic strat­e­gy efforts.

A motion sup­port­er, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Frank D. Lucas, R‑Oklahoma, said that accept­ing a Sen­ate pro­vi­sion to block fund­ing of enti­ties of con­cern con­trolled by the Chi­nese gov­ern­ment “ensures that we aren’t giv­ing tax­pay­er dol­lars to the adver­saries who are try­ing to steal U.S. tech­nol­o­gy and use it against us.”

The vote to instruct was 351 yeas to 74 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (3): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Peter DeFazio and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

Vot­ing Nay (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Earl Blu­me­nauer and Suzanne Bonamici

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (9): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Vot­ing Nay (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Adam Smith

Cas­ca­dia total: 14 aye votes, 3 nay votes

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate

The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

AMERICA COMPETES ACT: The Sen­ate on March 28th passed the Amer­i­ca COMPETES Act (H.R. 4521), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Eddie Ber­nice John­son, D‑Texas, to increase spend­ing on var­i­ous eco­nom­ic strat­e­gy efforts, includ­ing domes­tic man­u­fac­ture of semi­con­duc­tor chips, sci­en­tif­ic research, and trade and secu­ri­ty, espe­cial­ly as it relates to Chi­na. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Maria Cantwell, D‑Washington, said the bill “is about grow­ing the capac­i­ty for us to inno­vate in many dif­fer­ent parts of the Unit­ed States and across many dif­fer­ent sec­tors of our econ­o­my.” The vote was 68 yeas to 28 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 6 aye votes

NANI COLORETTI, OMB DEPUTY DIRECTOR: The Sen­ate on March 29th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Nani Col­oret­ti to be the Office of Man­age­ment and Bud­get’s deputy direc­tor. Col­oret­ti has been a gov­ern­ment staffer in San Fran­cis­co and in var­i­ous fed­er­al agen­cies dur­ing the Oba­ma admin­is­tra­tion; she has more recent­ly been a senior vice pres­i­dent at the Urban Insti­tute. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Gary C. Peters, D‑Michigan, said Col­oret­ti “has over 20 years of expe­ri­ence at the fed­er­al, state, and local lev­el exe­cut­ing com­plex gov­ern­ment pro­grams, improv­ing ser­vice deliv­ery, and man­ag­ing large organizations.”

The vote was 57 yeas to 41 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

C.S. ELIOT KANG, ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE: The Sen­ate on March 29th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of C.S. Eliot Kang to be the assis­tant sec­re­tary of state for inter­na­tion­al secu­ri­ty and non-pro­lif­er­a­tion (ISN). Kang has been in the role on an act­ing basis since the start of the Biden admin­is­tra­tion. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Robert Menen­dez, D‑New Jer­sey, said of Kang: “He has the sub­stan­tive exper­tise to lead ISN and advance U.S. nation­al secu­ri­ty inter­ests. Dur­ing his 18-year career at the State Depart­ment, Dr. Kang has worked on a wide vari­ety of non­pro­lif­er­a­tion issues.” The vote was 52 yeas to 46 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

JUDITH PRYOR, EXPORT-IMPORT BANK: The Sen­ate on March 30th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Judith Pry­or to be first vice pres­i­dent of the U.S. Export-Import Bank. Pry­or, cur­rent­ly a mem­ber of the Bank’s board of direc­tors, was an inter­na­tion­al finance offi­cial dur­ing the Oba­ma admin­is­tra­tion, and before that was an exec­u­tive in the satel­lite industry.

A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Sher­rod Brown, D‑Ohio, said: “It is essen­tial that our man­u­fac­tur­ers have every tool at their dis­pos­al so they can com­pete glob­al­ly. That is why we need Judith Pry­or at Ex-Im.” An oppo­nent, Sen­a­tor Pat Toomey, R‑Pennsylvania, said Pry­or’s con­fir­ma­tion would advance the “bad­ly flawed agen­da” of hav­ing the Bank sub­si­dize loans to domes­tic man­u­fac­tur­ing busi­ness­es and infra­struc­ture projects. The vote was 69 yeas to 30 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 6 aye votes

JANUARY CONTRERAS, ASSISTANT HEALTH SECRETARY: The Sen­ate on March 30th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Jan­u­ary Con­tr­eras to be assis­tant sec­re­tary for fam­i­ly sup­port at the Depart­ment of Health and Human Ser­vices. Con­tr­eras was a cit­i­zen­ship and immi­gra­tion offi­cial in the Oba­ma admin­is­tra­tion, and pre­vi­ous­ly was head of the Ari­zona Depart­ment of Health Ser­vices. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Ron Wyden, D‑Oregon, said Con­tr­eras would use her expe­ri­ence to help imple­ment the Fam­i­ly First pro­gram, which pro­vides addic­tion treat­ment ser­vices to a fam­i­ly with­out assign­ing its chil­dren to fos­ter care.

The vote was 54 yeas to 44 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

SARAH GERAGHTY, U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate on March 31st con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Sarah Ger­aghty to be a judge on the U.S. dis­trict court for the north­ern dis­trict of Geor­gia. Ger­aghty has been a lawyer at the South­ern Cen­ter for Human Rights since 2003. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Dick Durbin, D‑Illinois, said Ger­aghty “has received numer­ous let­ters of sup­port, includ­ing from law enforce­ment offi­cials and attor­neys who have opposed her in lit­i­ga­tion.” The vote was 52 yeas to 48 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

GEORGETTE CASTNER, U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate on March 31st con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Geor­gette Cast­ner to be a judge on the U.S. Dis­trict Court for New Jer­sey. Cast­ner has been a lawyer at a pri­vate prac­tice law firm in New Jer­sey since 2007, spe­cial­iz­ing in civ­il lit­i­ga­tion and white col­lar crime. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Dick Durbin, D‑Illinois, called Cast­ner “an expe­ri­enced lit­i­ga­tor with a deep knowl­edge of the Dis­trict of New Jersey.”

The vote was 52 yeas to 47 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

ADDITIONAL SENATE VOTES: Along with this week’s roll call votes, the Sen­ate also passed (by voice) the Chir­ic­ahua Nation­al Park Act (S. 1320), to estab­lish the Chir­ic­ahua Nation­al Park in Ari­zona as a unit of the Nation­al Park Sys­tem; and the Ocean Ship­ping Reform Act (S. 3580), to amend Unit­ed States Code with respect to pro­hib­it­ed acts by ocean com­mon car­ri­ers or marine ter­mi­nal operators.

Key votes ahead

The House will debate a res­o­lu­tion rec­om­mend­ing that the body find Trump aides Peter K. Navar­ro and Daniel Scav­i­no, Jr. in con­tempt of Con­gress for refus­ing to com­ply with sub­poe­nas duly issued by the Select Com­mit­tee To Inves­ti­gate The Jan­u­ary 6th Attack On The Unit­ed States Capitol.

The House is also expect­ed to take up the Relief for Restau­rants and oth­er Hard Hit Small Busi­ness­es Act of 2022. Depend­ing on dis­cus­sions with the Sen­ate, the House might vote on leg­is­la­tion relat­ed to COVID-19 sup­ple­men­tal funding.

The Sen­ate is expect­ed to con­sid­er a motion to dis­charge from the Judi­cia­ry Com­mit­tee Ketan­ji Brown Jack­son’s nom­i­na­tion to be an Asso­ciate Jus­tice of the Supreme Court of the Unit­ed States. If Sen­a­tor Susan Collins sup­ports the motion, Vice Pres­i­dent Kamala Har­ris’ tie-break­ing vote will not be required.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

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