NPI's Cascadia Advocate

Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's unconventional perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Tuesday, October 5th, 2021

Senator David Frockt to retire from the Legislature after the 2022 session

Sen­a­tor David Frockt — who has rep­re­sent­ed Wash­ing­ton’s 46th Leg­isla­tive Dis­trict in the Wash­ing­ton State Sen­ate since the pass­ing of the great Scott White — has decid­ed to leave the state­house after the 2022 ses­sion and pass the baton to some­one else, the Sen­ate Demo­c­ra­t­ic cau­cus announced today.

“When I first ran for office in 2010, I saw a need for new lead­er­ship in our com­mu­ni­ty,” said Frockt in a state­ment, ref­er­enc­ing his ini­tial campaign.

“Rep­re­sent­ing the peo­ple of North Seat­tle, Lake For­est Park and Ken­more since then has been a dis­tinct hon­or where I have been afford­ed the chance to work on some of the great­est chal­lenges fac­ing our state. But I came to this job with the firm con­vic­tion that the priv­i­lege of pub­lic ser­vice does not con­fer a right to a posi­tion that one holds for­ev­er, and for me, the time has come for renewal.”

“Sen­a­tor Frockt is both a good friend and a gift­ed leg­is­la­tor,” said Sen­ate Major­i­ty Leader Andy Bil­lig (D‑Spokane; 3rd District).

“I am grate­ful for his ser­vice to our state. He has been a leader on so many impor­tant issues, par­tic­u­lar­ly health care, high­er edu­ca­tion and the cap­i­tal bud­get. While his depar­ture at the end of 2022 will be a big loss for our cau­cus and the Leg­is­la­ture, I am glad that we have a final ses­sion to work togeth­er and cel­e­brate his many achieve­ments. The peo­ple of his dis­trict and our state will ben­e­fit from his thought­ful leg­is­la­tion for gen­er­a­tions to come.”

“David will be leav­ing a lega­cy to both his dis­trict and the state,” said Sen­a­tor Chris­tine Rolfes (D‑Bainbridge Island; 23rd Dis­trict), Chair of the Sen­ate Ways & Means Com­mit­tee, who works close­ly with Frockt. “He leads with a pas­sion for help­ing oth­ers and an abil­i­ty to cut through polit­i­cal noise to make real­ly strong, pro­gres­sive pub­lic pol­i­cy. His integri­ty, hum­ble demeanor, and sense of humor make him some­one that his col­leagues trust and enjoy work­ing with. He’s just an all-around great per­son, and I’m glad we get him for one more year.”

Sen­a­tor Frockt will unques­tion­ably be depart­ing with not just a lega­cy, but a great lega­cy Our team at NPI has been hon­ored to work with him over the years on chal­leng­ing Tim Eyman’s uncon­sti­tu­tion­al ini­tia­tives, increas­ing fund­ing for geo­log­ic haz­ards research, and bal­anc­ing the state’s upside down tax code.

Sen­a­tor Frockt has con­sis­tent­ly sup­port­ed NPI’s essen­tial research and advo­ca­cy, for which we are grate­ful. He is an incred­i­bly thought­ful and com­mit­ted leg­is­la­tor who takes the time to lis­ten to his con­stituents and activists work­ing for change.

We’ll miss his pres­ence in the Sen­ate Demo­c­ra­t­ic cau­cus after next year’s short leg­isla­tive ses­sion and the 2022 midterms, but hope­ful­ly there will be oppor­tu­ni­ties for us to con­tin­ue work­ing to advance pro­gres­sive caus­es together.

Because Sen­a­tor Frockt is retir­ing at the end of his term, there will not need to be a spe­cial nom­i­nat­ing cau­cus or appoint­ment process. Frockt will sim­ply pass the baton over to the per­son that vot­ers choose to suc­ceed him at the end of 2022.

The 46th, like all of Wash­ing­ton State’s leg­isla­tive dis­tricts, will look some­what dif­fer­ent once new maps are in place, but it’s like­ly to still be a North Seat­tle dis­trict. Peo­ple who might explore can­di­da­cies for the Wash­ing­ton State Sen­ate to suc­ceed Frockt could include State Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Ger­ry Pol­let, State Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Javier Valdez, or for­mer State Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jessyn Far­rell, who left the Leg­is­la­ture in 2017 to run for May­or of Seattle.

Adjacent posts

  • Enjoyed what you just read? Make a donation


    Thank you for read­ing The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate, the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute’s jour­nal of world, nation­al, and local politics.

    Found­ed in March of 2004, The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate has been help­ing peo­ple through­out the Pacif­ic North­west and beyond make sense of cur­rent events with rig­or­ous analy­sis and thought-pro­vok­ing com­men­tary for more than fif­teen years. The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate is fund­ed by read­ers like you and trust­ed spon­sors. We don’t run ads or pub­lish con­tent in exchange for money.

    Help us keep The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate edi­to­ri­al­ly inde­pen­dent and freely avail­able to all by becom­ing a mem­ber of the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute today. Or make a dona­tion to sus­tain our essen­tial research and advo­ca­cy journalism.

    Your con­tri­bu­tion will allow us to con­tin­ue bring­ing you fea­tures like Last Week In Con­gress, live cov­er­age of events like Net­roots Nation or the Demo­c­ra­t­ic Nation­al Con­ven­tion, and reviews of books and doc­u­men­tary films.

    Become an NPI mem­ber Make a one-time donation

Submit a Comment

By submitting a comment, you agree to abide by our Commenting Guidelines. If you submit any links to other websites in your comment or in the Website field, these will be published at our discretion. Please read our statement of Privacy Practices before commenting to understand how we collect and use submissions to the Cascadia Advocate. Your comment must be submitted with a name and email address as noted below. We will not publish or share your email address. *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

  • NPI’s essential research and advocacy is sponsored by: