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Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's unconventional perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Sunday, October 24th, 2021

Last Week In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. lawmakers voted (October 18th-22nd)

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Mem­bers of Con­gress vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing Fri­day, Octo­ber 22nd, 2021.

In the United States House of Representatives

Chamber of the United States House of Representatives

The House cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

HOLDING STEVE BANNON IN CONTEMPT OF CONGRESS: The House on Octo­ber 21st passed a res­o­lu­tion (H. Res. 730), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Ben­nie G. Thomp­son, D‑Mississippi, to find Steve Ban­non in con­tempt of Con­gress for declin­ing to obey a sub­poe­na issued by the House Select Com­mit­tee to Inves­ti­gate the Jan­u­ary 6th Attack on the Unit­ed States Capitol.

Thomp­son said that “unlike oth­er wit­ness­es who have engaged and worked with our team to find a way to coop­er­ate, Mr. Ban­non told us he would­n’t com­ply because the for­mer pres­i­dent told him not to.”

A res­o­lu­tion oppo­nent, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jim Banks, R‑Indiana, said: “The Select Com­mit­tee despis­es Steve Ban­non’s pol­i­tics, so they are abus­ing their pow­er to put him in jail.” The vote was 229 yeas to 202 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrader

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jaime Her­rera Beutler

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 12 aye votes, 5 nay votes

REQUIRING GUIDELINES FOR RENTAL CAR COMPANIES: The House on Octo­ber 19th passed the Dar­ren Drake Act (H.R. 4089), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Josh Got­theimer, D‑New Jer­sey, to require the Home­land Secu­ri­ty Depart­ment to issue guide­lines to car rental com­pa­nies on strate­gies for pre­vent­ing acts of ter­ror­ism that use vehi­cles they rent to individuals.

Got­theimer said the guide­lines “will pro­vide rental com­pa­nies and car deal­ers with the vital infor­ma­tion they need to flag and stop poten­tial ter­ror­ist threats in their tracks.” The vote was 379 yeas to 51 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

Vot­ing Nay (1): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Earl Blumenauer

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 aye votes, 2 nay votes

ELIMINATING EVENT PERMIT FEES FOR VETERANS: The House on Octo­ber 19th passed the Free Vet­er­ans from Fees Act (H.R. 1029), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Gre­go­ry W. Steube, R‑Florida, to waive spe­cial use per­mit fees for mil­i­tary vet­er­ans events at war memo­ri­als on fed­er­al land in the Wash­ing­ton, D.C., area. A sup­port­er, Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Ron Kind, D‑Wisconsin, said: “It is the right thing to do, to try to reduce the cost for a lot of these impor­tant com­mem­o­ra­tive occa­sions hap­pen­ing right here in our nation’s capital.”

The vote was 421 yeas to 3 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

IMPROVING DRUG RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT: The House on Octo­ber 19th passed the Nation­al Cen­ters of Excel­lence in Con­tin­u­ous Phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal Man­u­fac­tur­ing Act (H.R. 4369), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Frank Pal­lone Jr., D‑New Jer­sey. The bill would have the Food and Drug Admin­is­tra­tion des­ig­nate and fund cer­tain col­leges and uni­ver­si­ties as cen­ters for the devel­op­ment of con­tin­u­ous man­u­fac­tur­ing of phar­ma­ceu­ti­cal drugs.

Pal­lone said estab­lish­ing the cen­ters “will improve the qual­i­ty of our phar­ma­ceu­ti­cals, reduce drug short­ages, and help to pro­duce more nim­ble and effi­cient man­u­fac­tur­ing process­es that could be repli­cat­ed through­out the nation.” The vote was 368 yeas to 56 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

OPIOID PREVENTION GRANTS: The House on Octo­ber 20th passed the State Opi­oid Response Grant Autho­riza­tion Act (H.R. 2379), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive David J. Trone, D‑Maryland, to reau­tho­rize through 2027 the fed­er­al gov­ern­men­t’s opi­oid response pro­gram for send­ing grant mon­ey to states, and expand the pro­gram to include both opi­oid and oth­er forms of sub­stance abuse. Trone said the bill sought to give states “the con­sis­tent, nec­es­sary fund­ing they need to meet their spe­cif­ic needs” for pre­vent­ing abuse.

The vote was 380 yeas to 46 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 16 aye votes, 1 nay vote

WAIVING DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: The House on Octo­ber 20th passed the Drug-Free Com­mu­ni­ties Pan­dem­ic Relief Act (H.R. 654), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive David P. Joyce, R‑Ohio, to pro­vide for waiv­ing require­ments local gov­ern­ments must meet to receive fed­er­al match­ing fund­ing under the Drug-Free Com­mu­ni­ties Sup­port Pro­gram. Joyce said the waiv­er was need­ed because “with more Amer­i­cans dying from drug over­dos­es than ever before, it is crit­i­cal that we do every­thing we can to sup­port and empow­er those work­ing on the front lines in our com­mu­ni­ties to reduce and pre­vent addic­tion among our children.”

The vote was 395 yeas to 30 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

BETTER EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOR MEDICAL EMERGENCIES: The House on Octo­ber 20th passed the Strength­en­ing Amer­i­c­as Strate­gic Nation­al Stock­pile Act (H.R. 3635), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Elis­sa Slotkin, D‑Michigan. The bill would change oper­a­tion of the fed­er­al gov­ern­men­t’s stock­pile of equip­ment and drugs for use in med­ical emer­gen­cies, includ­ing set­ting out required stock­pil­ing lev­els and plans for distribution.

The vote was 397 yeas to 22 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (9): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan Newhouse

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 16 aye votes, 1 nay vote

HELPING SMALL TELECOMMUNICATIONS FIRMS ROLL OUT 5G RIGHT: The House on Octo­ber 20th passed the Open RAN Out­reach Act (H.R. 4032), spon­sored by Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Col­in Z. Allred, D‑Texas, to require the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment to work with small telecom­mu­ni­ca­tions providers on their deploy­ment of Open Radio Access Net­work (O‑RAN) wire­less tech­nol­o­gy to their cus­tomers. Allred said the bill sought to help the providers shift away from reliance on Chi­nese equip­ment man­u­fac­tur­ers and instead use Open RAN sys­tems that have a more diverse and com­pet­i­tive set of manufacturers.

The vote was 410 yeas to 17 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 17 aye votes

IMPROVING U.S. TECHNOLOGICAL STRATEGY: The House on Octo­ber 20th passed the Infor­ma­tion and Com­mu­ni­ca­tion Tech­nol­o­gy Strat­e­gy Act (H.R. 4028), spon­sored by Rep. Bil­ly Long, R‑Missouri, to require the Com­merce Depart­ment to cre­ate a gov­ern­ment-wide strat­e­gy for improv­ing the U.S. infor­ma­tion and com­mu­ni­ca­tions tech­nol­o­gy sec­tor. Long said of the need for a strat­e­gy: “With all the sup­ply chain dis­rup­tions we have seen this past year, it is impor­tant to know how our domes­tic pro­duc­tion of this cru­cial equip­ment can be strength­ened in the future.” The vote  was 413 yeas to 14 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

Not Vot­ing (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simpson

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, and Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Cliff Bentz

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Mar­i­lyn Strick­land; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 16 aye votes, 1 not voting

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate

The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

SENATE FAILS TO BREAK A FILIBUSTER OF THE FREEDOM TO VOTE ACT: The Sen­ate on Octo­ber 20th reject­ed a clo­ture motion to end debate on a motion to con­sid­er the Free­dom to Vote Act (S. 2747), spon­sored by Sen­a­tor Amy Klobuchar, D‑Minnesota.

The bill would make numer­ous changes to vot­ing and elec­tion pro­ce­dures, includ­ing declar­ing Elec­tion Day in Novem­ber as a fed­er­al hol­i­day, stip­u­lat­ing that only felons cur­rent­ly under sen­tence can be deemed inel­i­gi­ble to vote due to crim­i­nal offens­es, and estab­lish­ing new crim­i­nal offens­es for hin­der­ing peo­ple from vot­ing. Klobuchar said the bill was need­ed “because the free­dom to vote is fun­da­men­tal to all of our free­doms, and it is cur­rent­ly under attack.”

A bill oppo­nent, Sen­ate Minor­i­ty Leader Mitch McConnell, R‑Kentucky, said it was a wrong­ful attempt to have the fed­er­al gov­ern­ment usurp states’ author­i­ty over elec­tions and vot­ing law. The vote was 49 yeas to 51 nays.

Sen­ate Major­i­ty Leader Chuck Schumer tac­ti­cal­ly vot­ed with the Repub­li­cans so that he could bring the bill back up again at a lat­er date. Because Schumer sup­ports the bill, there were actu­al­ly fifty votes for it rather than forty-nine.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

GUSTAVO GELPI, APPEALS COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate on Octo­ber 18th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Gus­ta­vo A. Gelpi to serve as a judge on the U.S. First Cir­cuit Court of Appeals. Gelpi has been a fed­er­al dis­trict judge in Puer­to Rico since 2006. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Dick Durbin, D‑Illinois, said of Gelpi: “Lead­ers on both sides of the aisle trust that he will rule impar­tial­ly and with­out regard for par­ti­san­ship.” The vote was 52 yeas to 41 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

CHRISTINE O’HEARN, NEW JERSEY U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate has con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Chris­tine P. O’Hearn to serve as a judge on the U.S. dis­trict court for New Jer­sey. O’Hearn has been a pri­vate prac­tice lawyer in Cam­den since 1993, spe­cial­iz­ing in labor and employ­ment law. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Robert Menen­dez, D‑New Jer­sey, said O’Hearn’s “pro­fes­sion­al cre­den­tials, com­bined with her com­pas­sion and com­mit­ment to the fair and impar­tial admin­is­tra­tion of jus­tice, will make her an out­stand­ing judge.”

The vote was 53 yeas to 44 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

CHATHERINE LHAMON, ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION: The Sen­ate on Octo­ber 20th con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Chather­ine Lha­mon to be assis­tant sec­re­tary for civ­il rights at the Edu­ca­tion Depart­ment. Lha­mon served in the same post dur­ing Pres­i­dent Oba­ma’s sec­ond term, is a for­mer chair of the U.S. Com­mis­sion on Civ­il Rights, and, since 2019, has been Cal­i­for­ni­a’s legal affairs secretary.

A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Pat­ty Mur­ray, D‑Washington, said Lha­mon “has a long track record that proves she is a cham­pi­on for stu­dents through and through, and that is exact­ly what our stu­dents need.” The vote was 51 yeas to 50 nays, with Vice Pres­i­dent Har­ris cast­ing a 51st yea vote.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

TANA LIN, WASHINGTON U.S. DISTRICT COURT JUDGE: The Sen­ate on Octo­ber 21st con­firmed the nom­i­na­tion of Tana Lin to serve as a judge on the U.S. Dis­trict Court for the West­ern Dis­trict of Wash­ing­ton. Lin has been a pri­vate prac­tice lawyer at a Seat­tle law firm since 2004. A sup­port­er, Sen­a­tor Pat­ty Mur­ray, D‑Washington, said Lin “will bring integri­ty, inde­pen­dence, and com­pas­sion to the Seat­tle cour­t­house.” The vote was 52 yeas to 45 nays.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

PRISON CAMERA REFORM ACT: Along with this week’s roll call votes, the Sen­ate also passed the Prison Cam­era Reform Act (S. 2899), to require the Direc­tor of the Bureau of Pris­ons to address defi­cien­cies and make nec­es­sary upgrades to the secu­ri­ty cam­era and radio sys­tems of the Bureau of Pris­ons to ensure the health and safe­ty of employ­ees and inmates.

Key votes ahead

This week, the Sen­ate is sched­uled to con­sid­er more of Pres­i­dent Biden’s judi­cial nom­i­nees, includ­ing judges for the Dis­trict of Colum­bia, Vir­ginia, Con­necti­cut, and New Jer­sey. The Sen­ate may also recon­sid­er the Free­dom To Vote Act. The House will con­sid­er sev­er­al bills, includ­ing the Finan­cial Exploita­tion Pre­ven­tion Act of 2021 and the Fam­i­ly Vio­lence Pre­ven­tion and Ser­vices Improve­ment Act of 2021. The House may also con­sid­er The Build Back Bet­ter Act.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2021 Tar­get­ed News Ser­vice, LLC. 

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