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Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's unconventional perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Sunday, November 1st, 2020

Last Week In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. lawmakers voted (October 26th-30th)

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Unit­ed States Sen­a­tors vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing Fri­day, Octo­ber 30th.

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate

The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress photo)

CONFIRMING AMY CONEY BARRETT: Vot­ing 52 for and 48 against, the Sen­ate on Octo­ber 26th con­firmed Amy Coney Bar­rett, 48, as an asso­ciate jus­tice of the Supreme Court, replac­ing the late Ruth Bad­er Ginsburg.

She had been a fed­er­al appeals judge since 2018 and Uni­ver­si­ty of Notre Dame law pro­fes­sor start­ing in 2002.

Repub­li­cans said Bar­rett is a bril­liant jurist and per­son of faith who would respect con­sti­tu­tion­al word­ing and the bound­aries of set­tled law in her rulings.

Democ­rats called her a threat to estab­lished law in areas includ­ing abor­tion rights, health care, minori­ties’ bal­lot access and LGBTQ rights.

Democ­rats mocked Repub­li­cans for rush­ing Bar­rett onto the court days before a pres­i­den­tial elec­tion, after hav­ing side­lined for­mer Pres­i­dent Barack Oba­ma’s nom­i­na­tion of Mer­rick Gar­land to the court for near­ly nine months in 2016 on grounds it was a pres­i­den­tial elec­tion year.

John Thune, R‑South Dako­ta, said: “Judge Bar­rett brings a clear under­stand­ing of the prop­er role of a judge. She under­stands that the job of a judge is to inter­pret the law, not make the law… or, as [she] said in an answer to a sen­a­tor’s ques­tion, ‘I apply the law. I fol­low the law. You make the pol­i­cy.’ As [she] made clear in her hear­ing, she will be the kind of jus­tice who leaves her per­son­al beliefs and polit­i­cal opin­ions at the court­room door.”

Demo­c­ra­t­ic Leader Chuck Schumer, D‑New York, said: “Con­firm­ing a life­time appoint­ment this late into a pres­i­den­tial elec­tion sea­son is out­ra­geous. It is even more galling, of course, because [Repub­li­cans] refused to even con­sid­er the Supreme Court nom­i­na­tion of a Demo­c­ra­t­ic pres­i­dent on the grounds of the principle…that we should wait until after the pres­i­den­tial elec­tion because the Amer­i­can peo­ple deserved a voice in the selec­tion of their next justice.”

A yes vote was to con­firm Bar­rett as the 115th jus­tice of the Supreme Court.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 2 aye votes, 4 nay votes

HOLDING BARRETT VOTE BEFORE ELECTION: Vot­ing 53 for and 46 against, the Sen­ate on Octo­ber 25th blocked a Demo­c­ra­t­ic motion for adjourn­ment until after Novem­ber 3rd so that the Amy Coney Bar­rett con­fir­ma­tion vote would not occur before Amer­i­cans have cho­sen their next president.

Don­ald Trump announced the nom­i­na­tion on Sep­tem­ber 26th and the Judi­cia­ry Com­mit­tee sent it to the full cham­ber on Octo­ber 22nd. A yes vote was to put Bar­rett on the court before results are known from the pres­i­den­tial election.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Murray

Cas­ca­dia total: 2 aye votes, 4 nay votes

LWIC will be on hiatus next Sunday

Con­gress will be in recess this week due to the end of vot­ing in the 2020 pres­i­den­tial elec­tion. It is expect­ed to recon­vene on Novem­ber 9th.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Votera­ma in Con­gress, a ser­vice of Thomas Vot­ing Reports. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2020 Thomas Vot­ing Reports.

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