NPI's Cascadia Advocate

Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's unconventional perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Thursday, December 19th, 2019

Yesterday In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. Representatives voted on impeachment

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Unit­ed States Rep­re­sen­ta­tives vot­ed on impeach­ment dur­ing yes­ter­day’s his­toric House floor ses­sion, which end­ed at 5:53 PM Pacif­ic Time on Wednes­day, Decem­ber 18th, 2019.

In the United States House of Representatives

Chamber of the United States House of Representatives

The House cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress pho­to)

THE IMPEACHMENT OF DONALD JOHN TRUMP

ARTICLE I — ABUSE OF POWER: Vot­ing 230 for and 197 against, the House adopt­ed the first of two arti­cles of impeach­ment against Don­ald Trump.

The arti­cle declares Trump abused the pow­ers of the pres­i­den­cy when he and his admin­is­tra­tion with­held mil­i­tary aid to Ukraine and dan­gled the prospect of a White House vis­it by Ukraine’s pres­i­dent in order to pres­sure Ukraine’s gov­ern­ment to announce inves­ti­ga­tions relat­ed to for­mer Vice Pres­i­dent Joseph R. Biden Jr. and sup­posed (but nonex­is­tent) Ukran­ian involve­ment in the breach of the Demo­c­ra­t­ic Par­ty’s com­put­er sys­tems dur­ing the 2016 fed­er­al elec­tions.

Biden is seek­ing the 2020 Demo­c­ra­t­ic pres­i­den­tial nom­i­na­tion.

The arti­cle was sup­port­ed by 229 of the 231 Democ­rats who vot­ed and opposed by all 195 Repub­li­cans who vot­ed. Michi­gan inde­pen­dent Justin Amash vot­ed yes. The Democ­rats break­ing par­ty lines were Jeff Van Drew of New Jer­sey (who has defect­ed to Kevin McCarthy’s cau­cus) and Collin Peter­son of Min­neso­ta.

Tul­si Gab­bard, D‑Hawaii, was present for the roll call but answered “Present” instead of tak­ing a pro-or-con stand. She has called for Trump to be cen­sured.

The mem­bers not vot­ing were Demo­c­rat Jose Ser­ra­no of New York and Repub­li­cans Dun­can Hunter of Cal­i­for­nia and John Shimkus of Illi­nois.

The twelfth para­graph of the thir­teen para­graph arti­cle says Trump “abused the pow­ers of the pres­i­den­cy by ignor­ing and injur­ing nation­al secu­ri­ty and oth­er vital nation­al inter­ests to obtain an improp­er per­son­al polit­i­cal ben­e­fit. He has also betrayed the Nation by abus­ing his high office to enlist a for­eign pow­er in cor­rupt­ing demo­c­ra­t­ic elec­tions.”

Justin Amash, I‑Michigan, said: “Pres­i­dent Trump abused and vio­lat­ed the pub­lic trust by using his high office to solic­it the aid a for­eign pow­er, not for the ben­e­fit of the Unit­ed States of Amer­i­ca but instead for his per­son­al and polit­i­cal gain. His actions reflect pre­cise­ly the type of con­duct the framers of the Con­sti­tu­tion intend­ed to rem­e­dy through the pow­er of impeach­ment.”

Tom Cole, R‑Oklahoma, said the first arti­cle of impeach­ment is “based on an event that nev­er hap­pened, a pur­port­ed quid pro quo that did not exist. Aid that was alleged­ly with­held that in real­i­ty was nev­er with­held at all. And a nar­ra­tive based on noth­ing more than fan­ta­sy.”

A yes vote was to impeach Don­ald Trump for abuse of pow­er.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simp­son

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck

Vot­ing Nay (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 11 aye votes, 6 nay votes

ARTICLE II — OBSTRUCTION OF CONGRESS: Vot­ing 229 for and 198 against, the House adopt­ed the sec­ond of two arti­cles of impeach­ment against Don­ald Trump. The arti­cle charges Trump with inter­fer­ing with the House­’s con­sti­tu­tion­al­ly sanc­tioned impeach­ment process by direct­ing exec­u­tive branch agen­cies and cur­rent and for­mer offi­cials to defy sub­poe­nas for doc­u­ments and tes­ti­mo­ny.

The arti­cle was sup­port­ed by 228 of the 231 Democ­rats who vot­ed and opposed by all 195 Repub­li­cans who vot­ed. Amash vot­ed yes. The Democ­rats break­ing par­ty lines were Van Drew (who, as men­tioned, is in the process of join­ing Kevin McCarthy’s cau­cus), Peter­son and Jared Gold­en, D‑Maine. Gab­bard answered “present” and Ser­ra­no, Hunter and Shimkus were absent from the roll call.

The ninth para­graph of the eleven para­graph arti­cle states that Trump “sought to arro­gate to him­self the right to deter­mine the pro­pri­ety, scope and nature of an impeach­ment inquiry into his own con­duct. This abuse of office served to cov­er up the Pres­i­den­t’s own repeat­ed mis­con­duct and to seize and con­trol the pow­er of impeach­ment — and thus to nul­li­fy a vital con­sti­tu­tion­al safe­guard vest­ed sole­ly in the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives.”

Jer­rold Nadler, D‑N.Y., said: “With­in our sys­tem of checks and bal­ances, the pres­i­dent may not decide for him­self what con­sti­tutes a valid impeach­ment inquiry, nor may he ignore law­ful sub­poe­nas or direct oth­ers to do so. Many pres­i­dents have assert­ed priv­i­lege, but only Pres­i­dent Trump has ordered the cat­e­gor­i­cal defi­ance of a con­gres­sion­al inves­ti­ga­tion.”

Tom McClin­tock, R‑California, called the obstruc­tion arti­cle “a made-up crime.” “The pres­i­dent sought to defend his con­sti­tu­tion­al rights and those of his office. It removes the judi­cia­ry from our Con­sti­tu­tion and places Con­gress alone in the posi­tion of defin­ing its own pow­ers.”

A yes vote was to impeach Don­ald Trump for obstruc­tion of Con­gress.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simp­son

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck

Vot­ing Nay (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 11 aye votes, 6 nay votes

Coming up

This Sun­day morn­ing, at the usu­al time, we will pub­lish the final install­ment of Last Week In Con­gress for 2019, with analy­sis of addi­tion­al votes tak­en this week in the House of Rep­re­sen­ta­tives as well as in the Sen­ate.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Votera­ma in Con­gress, a ser­vice of Thomas Vot­ing Reports. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2019 Thomas Vot­ing Reports.

Adjacent posts

  • Sustain the Cascadia Advocate by joining us on April 17th!

    Join us online on April 17th for our 2020 Spring Gala!
  • Can’t attend the gala? Make a donation!


    Thank you for read­ing The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate, the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute’s jour­nal of world, nation­al, and local pol­i­tics.

    Found­ed in March of 2004, The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate has been help­ing peo­ple through­out the Pacif­ic North­west and beyond make sense of cur­rent events with rig­or­ous analy­sis and thought-pro­vok­ing com­men­tary for more than fif­teen years. The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate is fund­ed by read­ers like you: we have nev­er accept­ed adver­tis­ing or place­ments of paid con­tent.

    And we’d like it to stay that way.

    Help us keep The Cas­ca­dia Advo­cate edi­to­ri­al­ly inde­pen­dent and freely avail­able by becom­ing a mem­ber of the North­west Pro­gres­sive Insti­tute today. Or make a dona­tion to sus­tain our essen­tial research and advo­ca­cy jour­nal­ism.

    Your con­tri­bu­tion will allow us to con­tin­ue bring­ing you fea­tures like Last Week In Con­gress, live cov­er­age of events like Net­roots Nation or the Demo­c­ra­t­ic Nation­al Con­ven­tion, and reviews of books and doc­u­men­tary films.

    Become an NPI mem­ber Make a one-time dona­tion

One Ping

  1. […] (For a recap of Wednes­day’s impeach­ment votes, please see this spe­cial report.) […]