NPI's Cascadia Advocate

Offering commentary and analysis from Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, The Cascadia Advocate is the Northwest Progressive Institute's unconventional perspective on world, national, and local politics.

Sunday, November 24th, 2019

Last Week (November 18–22) In Congress: How Cascadia’s U.S. lawmakers voted

Good morn­ing! Here’s how Cascadia’s Mem­bers of Con­gress vot­ed on major issues dur­ing the leg­isla­tive week end­ing Fri­day, Novem­ber 22nd.

In the United States House of Representatives

Chamber of the United States House of Representatives

The House cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress pho­to)

APPROVING AGENCY FUNDING THRU DECEMBER 20TH: Vot­ing 231 for and 192 against, the House on Novem­ber 19th approved stop­gap appro­pri­a­tions (H.R. 3055) to fund the gov­ern­ment at fis­cal 2019 lev­els between Novem­ber 21st and Decem­ber 20th, giv­ing nego­tia­tors more time to seek agree­ment on a reg­u­lar, full-year bud­get for fis­cal 2020, which began about sev­en weeks ago.

One stick­ing point is Pres­i­dent Trump’s request, opposed by Democ­rats, for $9 bil­lion in Depart­ment of Home­land Secu­ri­ty fund­ing for a bor­der wall. In addi­tion to avert­ing anoth­er fed­er­al gov­ern­ment shut­down, the bill adds mon­ey to ensure a “fair and accu­rate” 2020 Cen­sus, respond to an ebo­la virus out­break in Africa and fund a 3.1 per­cent mil­i­tary pay raise that took effect Octo­ber 1st

Major­i­ty Leader Ste­ny Hoy­er, D‑Maryland, said: “I hope we use these days that are left between today and Decem­ber 20th in a pro­duc­tive, effec­tive way so that the appro­pri­a­tions process can be con­clud­ed on Decem­ber 20th or before.”

Steve Wom­ack, R‑Arkansas, object­ed to increas­ing manda­to­ry spend­ing by $76 bil­lion with­out off­set­ting cuts and expressed doubt that Con­gress “will enact a full-year defense spend­ing bill, which the mil­i­tary so des­per­ate­ly needs right now.”

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Mike Simp­son

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci and Kurt Schrad­er

Vot­ing Nay (3): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Peter DeFazio and Earl Blu­me­nauer; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (8): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Dan New­house and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 14 aye votes, 3 nay votes

PREVENTING WORKPLACE VIOLENCE AT HOSPITALS, SOCIAL AGENCIES: Vot­ing 251 for and 158 against, the House on Novem­ber 21st passed a bill (H.R. 1309) requir­ing the Depart­ment of Labor to issue a rule designed to reduce work­place vio­lence at med­ical facil­i­ties includ­ing hos­pi­tals, nurs­ing homes and out­pa­tient clin­ics, where attacks occur far more fre­quent­ly than in the over­all work­place, accord­ing to fed­er­al sta­tis­tics.

The rule would also apply to social ser­vices facil­i­ties includ­ing voca­tion­al-reha­bil­i­ta­tion and child day-care ser­vices and com­mu­ni­ty food and hous­ing agen­cies. The bill defines work­place vio­lence as acts or threats of forcible action that could cause phys­i­cal injury of psy­cho­log­i­cal trau­ma or stress.

The bill directs the Occu­pa­tion­al Health and Safe­ty Agency to put the rule in oper­a­tion with­in two years of enact­ment.

Mark DeSaulnier, D‑California, said “there is an epi­dem­ic of vio­lence against health­care and social work­ers in the Unit­ed States. Last year, Depart­ment of Labor sta­tis­tics show they were near­ly five times as like­ly to suf­fer a seri­ous work­place vio­lence injury than work­ers in oth­er indus­tries.”

Michael Burgess, R‑Texas, said: “We can all agree that there is a need for OSHA to issue prop­er work­place vio­lence pre­ven­tion reg­u­la­tions,” but object­ed to the expe­dit­ed timetable for putting the rule into effect.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Mike Simp­son and Russ Fulcher

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (5): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (10): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck; Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 15 aye votes, 2 nay votes

FAULTING DEMOCRATS’ LEGISLATIVE PRIORITIES: Vot­ing 222 for and 188 against, the House on Novem­ber 21st effec­tive­ly killed a Repub­li­can motion to HR 1309 (above) assert­ing that House Democ­rats were wrong­ly “pri­or­i­tiz­ing impeach­ment of the pres­i­dent’ over advanc­ing mea­sures to fund the Pen­ta­gon, low­er pre­scrip­tion-drug prices, secure the south­west­ern bor­der and approve the pend­ing Unit­ed States-Mex­i­co-Cana­da Agree­ment on free trade.

On this vote, the House sus­tained a point of order raised by Democ­rats that the Repub­li­can motion was not ger­mane to the sub­stance of bill there­fore out of order.

Joe Court­ney, D‑Connecticut, said: “On behalf of America’s nurs­es, doc­tors and social work­ers, who are beg­ging for relief from unprece­dent­ed lev­els of work­place vio­lence, I insist upon my point of order.”

Mike Kel­ly, R‑Pennsylvania, said Democ­rats were shirk­ing leg­isla­tive oblig­a­tions “while we have wast­ed pre­cious time and mil­lions of hard­work­ing Amer­i­can tax­pay­er dol­lars on a pur­suit of an effort to impeach” Pres­i­dent Trump.

A yes vote was to turn back a non­bind­ing state­ment offered by Repub­li­cans.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Russ Fulcher and Mike Simp­son

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (4): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzanne Bonam­i­ci, Earl Blu­me­nauer, Peter DeFazio, Kurt Schrad­er

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Greg Walden

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (7): Demo­c­ra­t­ic Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Suzan Del­Bene, Rick Larsen, Derek Kilmer, Prami­la Jaya­pal, Kim Schri­er, Adam Smith, and Den­ny Heck

Vot­ing Nay (3): Repub­li­can Rep­re­sen­ta­tives Jaime Her­rera-Beut­ler, Dan New­house, and Cathy McMor­ris Rodgers

Cas­ca­dia total: 11 aye votes, 6 nay votes

In the United States Senate

Chamber of the United States Senate

The Sen­ate cham­ber (U.S. Con­gress pho­to)

SENDING STOPGAP BILL TO PRESIDENT TRUMP: Vot­ing 74 for and 20 against, the Sen­ate on Novem­ber 21st joined the House (above) in pass­ing a bill (H.R. 3055) that would fund agen­cies on a stop­gap basis from Novem­ber 21st through Decem­ber 20th. In addi­tion to its fund­ing author­i­ty, the bill keeps the Export-Import Bank in oper­a­tion until Decem­ber 20th and extends until March 15th cer­tain For­eign Intel­li­gence Sur­veil­lance Act anti-ter­ror­ism pro­vi­sions that oth­er­wise would expire Decem­ber 15th.

John Cornyn, R‑Texas, said:

“I hope that good faith [bud­get] nego­ti­a­tions can resume and we can fund the remain­der of the fis­cal year by Christ­mas because the last stock­ing stuffer we want to give the Amer­i­can peo­ple is anoth­er gov­ern­ment shut­down.”

No sen­a­tor spoke against the over­all bill.

A yes vote was to send the bill to Don­ald Trump, who signed it into law.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Aye (1): Repub­li­can Sen­a­tor Mike Crapo

Vot­ing Nay (1): Repub­li­can Sen­a­tor Jim Risch

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Mur­ray

Cas­ca­dia total: 5 aye votes, 1 nay vote

SHIFTING $12 BILLION TO INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS: Vot­ing 73 for and 20 against, the Sen­ate on Novem­ber 21st tabled (killed) an amend­ment to HR 3055 (above) that sought to cut 1 per­cent from fis­cal 2019 agency bud­gets and allo­cate the $12 bil­lion sav­ings to road, bridge and water projects fund­ed by the High­way Trust Fund and Envi­ron­men­tal Pro­tec­tion Agency. The across-the-board cut would be inflict­ed retroac­tive­ly on all domes­tic, mil­i­tary and for­eign-affairs accounts on the dis­cre­tionary-spend­ing side of the fed­er­al bud­get.

Patrick Leahy, D‑Vermont, called the pro­posed blan­ket cut “a sim­plis­tic tool that ignores the com­plex­i­ties of our fed­er­al bud­get. It is not a way we should gov­ern.”

Amend­ment spon­sor Rand Paul, R‑Kentucky, said “infra­struc­ture in Amer­i­ca is falling behind. Every­one knows it, but like so many things, Wash­ing­ton can’t fig­ure out how tofind the mon­ey to fix it.” He said his plan “does­n’t increase tax­es and does­n’t increase our debt. The pen­ny plan for infra­struc­ture pays for it with mon­ey we have already allo­cat­ed.”

A yes vote was to kill the amend­ment.

The State of Idaho

Vot­ing Nay (2):
Repub­li­can Sen­a­tors Jim Risch and Mike Crapo

The State of Oregon

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

The State of Washington

Vot­ing Aye (2):
Demo­c­ra­t­ic Sen­a­tors Maria Cantwell and Pat­ty Mur­ray

Cas­ca­dia total: 4 aye votes, 2 nay votes

Last Week In Congress will be on hiatus next weekend

Con­gress is in Thanks­giv­ing Day recess in the week of Novem­ber 25th.

Edi­tor’s Note: The infor­ma­tion in NPI’s week­ly How Cas­ca­di­a’s U.S. law­mak­ers vot­ed fea­ture is pro­vid­ed by Votera­ma in Con­gress, a ser­vice of Thomas Vot­ing Reports. All rights are reserved. Repro­duc­tion of this post is not per­mit­ted, not even with attri­bu­tion. Use the per­ma­nent link to this post to share it… thanks!

© 2019 Thomas Vot­ing Reports.

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One Comment

  1. Why does Her­rera Beut­ler keep miss­ing votes?

    # by Yoland Both :: November 24th, 2019 at 9:40 PM

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